March 4, 1861

The final paragraph of Abraham Lincoln’s first Inaugural Address, delivered this day, 150 years ago:

“I am loath to close. We are not enemies, but friends. We must not be enemies. Though passion may have strained it must not break our bonds of affection. The mystic chords of memory, stretching from every battlefield, and patriot grave, all over this broad land, will yet swell the chorus of the Union, when again touched, as surely they will be, by the better angels of our nature.”

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Author: qcexaminer

None of your damned business.

3 thoughts on “March 4, 1861”

  1. Obviously, there were no anti-American liberals in 1861. There was no way Mr. Lincoln could have known that 30% of the citizenry would want to destroy the country he loved.

  2. The contemporary literature shows the South had been agitating for war and secession for years—they were just looking for an excuse to pull the trigger.

    Amazingly, most people in the country believed states had the right to withdraw from the union.

    Reading Lincoln’s address, knowing what the future would bring, you can’t help be see his speech as anything other than an attempt to move to the center and try to calm overwrought emotions and passions.

    Ultimately, the “better angels” got slaughtered.

  3. Depending on how individuals interpret the Constitution, there are still many people that believe secession is a states right.

    Lincoln had a tough job tying to reach out to a conquered Southern mass as well as those from the North bitter over the bloody cost of preserving the Union. Part of the reasoning behind Shermans March had to be to finish breaking the spirit of the nonbelievers of the Southern Cause that supported the war.

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